Prolotherapy scam

Prolotherapy side effects

Prolotherapy is one of the commonest forms of treating pains as it combines a number of techniques to heal or repair damaged tendons and ligaments in the body. History has it that the use of prolotherapy can be traced to the Hippocrates, where a hot poker was used in repairing rotator cuffs of javelin throwers, with a hot needle lanced in the back region to treat back pains. This form of treatment was found that to stimulate inflammation and help the body heal naturally.

Prolotherapy like any major form of popular treatment have come under scrutiny in recent years with some claims that it has some side effects which could be a major drawback to the use of this form of healing strategy. It is however important to note that there is virtually no procedure that is totally risk-free and considering the effects of chronic pain, one would naturally want to opt for any form of treatment that promises to heal the pain.

For anyone that has some encounter with back pain, especially chronic back pain, the following experiences will not be strange. Financial stress, insomnia, increased weight has a result of immobility, restricted movement, loss of independence, and a deterioration of the overall health, all which might result in the collapse of the family, are some of the major risks associated with chronic pain. Besides the experiences mentioned above, anyone suffering from chronic pain tends to have a negative perception to life.

With the experiences stated above, it is not surprising that people that suffer from pain opt for different forms of treatments which might include hypnosis, use of herbs and vitamins, massage, pain pills, electrical stimulation, acupuncture, and a host of others. These treatments have their merits and demerits just like prolotherapy and it mostly depends on individual preference to select a particular form of treatment or treatments as the case may be.

Side effects of Prolotherapy

There are quite a number of side effects that have been attributed to using prolotherapy to treat chronic pain. Some of these side effects are highlighted below.

  • Swelling especially around the treated area.

  • Bleeding in the treated region.

  • Spinal headache.

  • Injury to the nerve.

  • Injury to the ligament or tendon.

  • Bruising in the region.

  • Infection.

Most of the side effects mentioned above should not last for more than a week. Infection, especially of the skin, as a result of prolotherapy however remains the most serious side effect yet. The treatment of such an infection will last for an average of six weeks which might also mean the patient will have to incur some additional costs.

As mentioned earlier, every treatment comes with side effects and prolotherapy is not an exception to the rule.